Thrillers vs romance. Thrillers = new winner.

From today’s Daily Mail:

Crime stories and thrillers have killed off romantic novels as the most-borrowed genre of book in Britain’s libraries, research has shown.

But, as usual, we can find some entertaining comments from the public.

Given the format of this man’s novels, this reader must have had one page and a paragraph left before giving up?  Would you stop there?

Moving on…

Quite right too.  At least they got it right in the article itself, even if a previous commenter didn’t.

Moving on…

These two are related?  (Literary merit & number of killings.)

This reader means Wilbur, yes?

Some free advice: avoid glue when reading.  (This makes for unhappy librarians.)

One thought on “Thrillers vs romance. Thrillers = new winner.

  1. Ted Simon

    Love can often spice up a good thriller. The number of Jack Reacher novels from Lee Child in which a love interest does NOT develop is exactly zero. Women love Jack Reacher – after all, he is intelligent, nice looking and a force of nature. Men, while they may not love him, certainly want to be him. A great part of Reacher’s appeal is the fact that he is an unbelievable character that the reader loves in spite of this and it is exactly why Child’s novels are so brilliant.

    In this same vein, Elmore Leonard’s novels usually include some sexual tension between the characters. Leonard caught the magic of love at first sight in the interaction between Ben Tyler and Amelia Brown in Cuba Libre. In Out of Sight, US marshall Karen Sisco and bank robber Jack Foley fall love while locked in the trunk of a car together.

    Crime and romance are certainly not mutually exclusive. Having both of these elements in a book makes the characters more interesting and likable and helps engage the reader.

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