John Lawton’s A Lily of the Field reviewed in the UK media

LofTFUKjpeg There's an excellent review this weekend by Roz Kaveney in The Independent. (And it's a wonderfully written review too.)

I hear on the grapevine that the Daily Telegraph may be covering the novel shortly, possibly this weekend, and will update this post with a link if so.

Previous reviews from across the pond include The Washington Post, The New York Times, The Seattle Times, Canada's Globe and Mail.

 

038 [Update: not online yet, but I have a pic of the Jeremy Jehu review in today's Daily Telegraph, see left.  He's thinking as I am thinking (below).  Let's hope we are both right for this is a wonderful series.]

I have been picking up on a bit of a buzz about Lawton recently and one of those reviews notes 'the work of a writer at the peak of his powers'.  He was shortlisted for the CWA Short Story Dagger the other week.  I wonder if 2011 will be the year when he reaps more than his usual crops of potatoes, onions, leeks and garlic?

 Find this, his latest novel and current availablity of his work on Amazon here. Like collecting? Go to Goldsboro Books.

 

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The author will be at Goldsboro Books's Crime in the Court event on 21 June (18:30 to 20:30).

A mere stone's throw away is Goodwin's Court, home of Freddie Troy in Lawton's novels, pictured left as it is today.

6 thoughts on “John Lawton’s A Lily of the Field reviewed in the UK media

  1. Norm

    I agree it is a wonderful series which you recommended to me. I have only the last chronologically to read now, A Little White Death. A fabulous series with so many good things, including a short hero, who always gets the women. ;o)
    Let’s hope John Lawton fills in more gaps in Freddie Troy’s career.

  2. crimeficreader

    Lawton believes A Little White Death is his best in the series and it’s one to hold some resonance for you, Norm! I am sure you will enjoy it.

  3. Yvonne Johnston

    At your recommendation I have at last got round to reading ‘Second Violin’ by John Lawton. I bought it because it is the first, chronologically, in the series. Only about 40 pages in so far but I am really enjoying it. My only gripe is that not all the novels in the series are available in Kindle format and, those that are, are NOT priced competitively. I am happy to pay as much for Kindle format as I would for the paperback. To charge more strikes me a profiteering.(I realise the price is set by the publisher and not the author)

  4. crimeficreader

    Yvonne, the situation is this.
    Lawton recently moved publishing house and, thankfully, the backlist rights with him. However, this will lead to a delay in availability on Kindle as the complete backlist needs digitising. Moving rights can take a while to organise too. I am told they will start to be available next year in spring to coincide with the Lily PB.
    Having looked at Amazon it appears that both the Kindle editions available now originate with the US publisher, which still holds the rights and currently publishes the author. As for pricing, we’ll have to see what Atlantic do on that when they have them ready. I suspect Second Violin’s price has something to do with US origination, being taken as an import by Amazon perhaps?
    I’ll let you know if and when I hear more.

  5. Yvonne Johnston

    Thanks Rhian – I suspect there are many like me who hear of an interesting novel, look it up on Amazon to find out if it is available in Kindle format and, where it is, immediately download the sample. My Kindle sample collection has become a kind of journal of every interesting review I’ve read and think I may at some point want to investigate further. Had it not been for the fact that I know a recommendation from you will be worth following up, I would probably have forgotten all about this latest Lawton novel after discovering it was not available in Kindle format.

  6. Steve Anderson

    That was a nice review in the Independent. Makes me want to drop what I’m reading and return to the rest of Lawton’s series. As the review notes, the best novels in these genres are not about murders and spies but well-drawn characters who happen to be (or be after) murderers and spies. Thanks for providing the latest on Lawton as always.

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